New article in BJPS on the effect of canvassing in Europe and U.S. – Københavns Universitet

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18. februar 2017

New article in BJPS on the effect of canvassing in Europe and U.S.

Yosef Bhatti, Jens Olav Dahlgaard, Jonas Hedegaard Hansen and Kasper M. Hansen from CVAP have recently published an article in the British Journal of Political Science about the effect of door-to-door canvassing on voter turnout in Europe and the United States. The article is a product of the research project entitled Causal Effects on Turnout, from which you can find other publications from by following this link [http://cvap.polsci.ku.dk/forskning/valgdeltagelse/papers__og_rapporter/]. You can read the abstract below and the full article here [link: https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/british-journal-of-political-science/article/div-classtitleis-door-to-door-canvassing-effective-in-europe-evidence-from-a-meta-study-across-six-european-countriesdiv/3B8CE74EDE8C4F2382FCEC0685F7DE25].

Is Door-to-Door Canvassing Effective in Europe? Evidence from a Meta-study across Six European Countries.
Yosef Bhatti, Jens Olav Dahlgaard, Jonas Hedegaard Hansen and Kasper M. Hansen
British Journal of Political Science (online first).

Abstract: A vast amount of experimental evidence suggests that get-out-the-vote encouragements delivered through door-to-door canvassing have large effects on turnout. Most of the existing studies have been conducted in the United States, and are inspiring European mobilization campaigns. This article explores the empirical question of whether the American findings are applicable to Europe. It combines existing European studies and presents two new Danish studies to show that the pooled point estimate of the effect is substantially smaller in Europe than in the United States, and finds no effects in the two Danish experiments. The article discusses why the effects seem to be different in Europe compared to the United States, and stresses the need for further experiments in Europe as there is still considerable uncertainty regarding the European effects. While one possible explanation is that differences in turnout rates explain the differences in effect sizes, the empirical analysis finds no strong relationship between turnout and effect sizes in either Europe or the United States.